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Joint Aid

    Commonly asked questions...

As agility people and dog lovers, we are constantly mindful of the stress our sport put onto our dog’s joints. There are plenty of outside factors which can affect our dogs such as the surface they compete on, they way they move around a course and getting to the competitions in the first place. GWF Nutrition’s Managing Director Stephen Tucker answers those questions from a nutritional point of view, about how we can protect our dog’s joints from the inside by what we feed.

Here are some frequently asked questions about dogs and their welfare in relation to competing and enjoying the sport of Agility.

Q. How can good nutrition help dog’s joints especially when they take part in agility what with the stress and strain put on joints with the twisting and turning?

A. Good nutrition should involve the supplementation of nutrients that convey health benefits (nutricines) in the diet. These can be supplied in the dog’s complete feed or in a specific supplement added to the daily feed.

Sources of molecules used for the repair of wear from glucosamine, chondroitin, collagen and sulphur in combination with water soluble and fat soluble antioxidants like vitamin C, curcuminoids and tocotrienols provide support against tissue damage and degeneration caused by free radicals, (molecules responsible for ageing and tissue damage).

Exercise increases the production of potentially damaging free radicals at cellular level where oxygen is involved so maintaining natural repair and protection systems are very important.

Q.  Are there other factors to take into consideration such as the surface the dog competes which could cause concussion on joints. Can this also be the case with other equipment such as weaving poles, jumps and see-saws.

A. Anything that increases the impact levels, the extension of limbs in awkward angles and the level of exercise puts more pressure on the joints, tendons and ligaments of the dog. These will increase the level of wear (tissue damage) and thus increase the need for normal healthy repair and protection.

Unfortunately the onset of age and lower digestive efficiency in the dog can reduce the effectiveness of these metabolic processes.


Joint Aid for Dogs

One such supplement is Joint Aid for Dogs. It is a complementary feed for dogs providing a painless economical aid for maintaining healthy joints. It contains 12 active ingredients – the latest to be added is Omega 3 to support optimum health, fertility and performance.

Joint Aid for Dogs helps maintain the natural anti inflammatory actions of the dog’s metabolism and supports the normal wear and repair of cartilage and synovial fluid. It provides the building blocks required for natural replenishment and is wheat gluten free.

Q. What about stress to the dog which might affect its gut / stomach such as the travelling to the showground and being part of the event itself.

 A. Temporary digestive upsets will not affect these normal processes. It is very much a long term problem!

It's age which is the predominant factor in reducing digestive capability. The constant supply and utilisation of nutrients is essential for maintain healthy joints. We all know that joint problems occur in older dogs and this reflects a decline in repair and protection systems that are fuelled by good digestion.

For more information or to order, please visit: www.gwfnutrition.com or ring GWF Nutrition direct on tel. 01225 708482.

About the author...
Stephen Tucker
joined GWF Nutrition or Gro-Well Feeds Ltd as it was, in 1977. He initially took care of the manufacture and delivery of agricultural feeds before being involved in feed formulations and sourcing of raw materials. Now Stephen is Managing Director, Chairman of the board of directors and nutritionist for GWF Nutrition.

In the late 1980s the company moved into equine products after recognising continued uncertainty in the agricultural world. Stephen's role within the company continued to develop

He says, 'I became Managing Director in 2005 and Chairman in 2008. In the 33 years I have been employed at GWF Nutrition, I have progressed from the bottom rung of the career ladder to the top and been involved in every aspect of the company. It has been a very enjoyable journey and remarkable in that we could never have foreseen, from our humble farm-based beginning, where GWF Nutrition would be today i.e. manufacturing specialist complementary feeds and supplements and exporting all around the world.'

Formed in 1971, it is today one of the few family owned and independently run companies left in the UK that specialise in the design, production and sale of high quality feeds and supplements for a range of animals, including horses, dogs and camelids.