Welcome | Startline | Clubs & Trainers | Events | Facebook | Fleamarket | Rescues | Senior League | Show Diary | Workshops | Contact Us

Up ]

Single Dose Vaccinations

Are you playing games with your dog's health

 

Do you know anyone whose healthy dog has suffered an inexplicable illness shortly after a routine vaccination? Does your club insist on annual boosters? Following his request on the Desperately seeking... page to find 'single vaccinations,' Keith Powell set out to find the right vet to help him. His search makes  interesting reading.

I know of many people, including myself, whose healthy dogs have suffered an inexplicable illness shortly following regular vaccinations. Our dogs do not become ill from the vaccination itself but, after attending a lecture in 2000 given by Dr. John Angles (1), I do hold the view that certain breeds and certain dogs are more susceptible to immune-medicated diseases than others.

However, Dr Angles has the view that, at present, the benefit of vaccination outweighs the problems but for those dogs who are susceptible to 'the problems,' there is no way of identifying particular individuals, and vaccinating these dogs is a bit like playing Russian Roulette. In the Akita population, he has found there is a 9.3% prevalence of a dog falling foul to one of the serious immune-mediated diseases and this prevalence does not follow particular breed lines.

He believes that, if a dog is susceptible, one of the booster jabs sets up a hypersensitivity and the following vaccination sets up the auto-immune system to react in some unpredictable way! This could present as a blood disease, particular organ failure or joint problem. The number of possibilities is too long to list.

I also strongly believe in the benefits of vaccination, but I refuse to play Russian Routlette with the health of my dogs. Instead I have the necessary full puppy vaccinations and, at yearly intervals, have a blood test to indicate my dogs antibody status, costing about 40/dog. Canine parainfluenza and leptospira vaccinations are short lived, should be repeated annually and not detected by the tests used by my vet but canine parvovirus, distemper and adenovirus are detectable. My dog's immune status is then recorded on its individual caccination record card should a dog club or kennel wish to see it.

The record of my dogs antibody levels are attached and it makes fascinating reading. Why these levels fluctuate is difficult to say, as is the reason for some levels going off the scale Ill leave that for the vets to debate.

My recent note on the Agilitynet (February 2006) was to find a vet or a supplier of single vaccines. Although one vaccine company is now recommending the canine parvovirus, distemper and adenovirus vaccinations together once every three years, with annual jabs for parainfluenza and leptospira. However, I am led to believe most vets continue follow the routine of annual boosters for all five common viruses.

It was very exasperating to find that very few vets could supply single vaccines. I now know that parvo, parainfluenza and lepto can be obtained singly but adenovirus and distemper usually come as a joint combination. However, the suppliers only sell any of these in multiple packs of ten or more for each vaccine.

Following numerous fruitless calls to local vets, I was beginning to feel very despondent as no one was able - or willing - to supply single doses of vaccine. But, thanks to an enterprising vet, David Bradbury, from the Beacon Hill Veterinary Centre, Hindhead, Surrey GU26  6NR (tel. 01428  606396) and his professional contacts, he managed to source the single vaccinations that I require. This means that I can continue to blood test my dogs and remove the need to play Russian roulette with their 'vaccination' health.

I hope that this article will provide those worried about canine vaccinations with an alternative route to follow.

(1)  Dr John Angles  1999  B.V.Sc, M.V.Studies. Ralston Purina Lecturer in Small Animal Special Medicine, The University College, Dublin. His research is focused on looking for gene or chromosome markers to determine which dogs are susceptible to immune related disease following routine vaccinations, within certain breeds.

Vaccination Levels of Keith Powells Dogs

 

Magic

Kats

Quinn

Kelmi

DoB

26/4/00

9/7/02

6/10/04

23/9/05

Breed

Finnish Lapphund

Japanese Akita Inu

Border Collie

Kromfohrlander

Virus

Measure of blood titres indicating antibody levels

October 2001 

 

 

 

Parvo

4096

 

 

 

Distemper

2896

 

 

 

Adenovirus

8192

 This new puppy

 

 

October 2002

arrived & vaccinated

 

 

Parvo

4096

   August 2002

 

 

Distemper

2896

 

 

 

Adenovirus

2048

 

 

 

October 2003 

 

 

 

Parvo

4096

4096

 

 

Distemper

2896

128

 New dog

 

Adenovirus

892

512

 visited for 3 weeks

 

October 2004

 July 2004

 

Parvo

4096

4096

 

 

Distemper

11584

1448

New puppy arrived &

 This new puppy

Adenovirus

4096

512

 vaccinated Dec 2004

arrived & vaccinated

December 2005

November 2005

Parvo

64  #

32 #

256

 

Distemper

1024

181

28 #

# = booster

Adenovirus

8192

512

16 #

required

 

 

 

 

 

 

Titre level indications

 

Parvo    &

Distemper

Action recommended

Adenovirus

(a blood disease)

Under 4

No sig. antibody

Booster required

Under 8

No significant antibody

4 to 84

Low antibody titre

Booster required

8 to 32

Low antibody titre

85 to 128

High titre, immune dog

No need for booster

64 to 512

Moderate titre, immune dog

 

 

No need for booster

513 to 1024

High titre, immune dog

About the author...
Keith Powell's first love in the canine world was the large Japanese Akita. It took him two years to find the right dog, which came to him in 1997. It was a gentle giant and he trained her to be a PAT Dog, working with young children at Frimley Park Hospital. Keith says, 'I suppose the first dog you own is always special. It took him many years to get over the loss of his 'teddy bear' friend when it died of an auto-immune illness in 2001, a few weeks following routine vaccination.

In 2000 he bought a Finnish Lapphund, mainly to be a companion to his Akita. His Akita did agility so from the end of 2001 onwards, he consumed himself in agility with his Lapphund who has gained much respect, success and interest, competing in Midi competitions. Magic, his Lapphund, an early holder of the Agility Warrant, is a Senior dog looking for that elusive second agility win to make her Advanced. She has won her class twice at Crufts. The pinnacle of their success was finishing fourth in the British Open in 2005, being selected for England B at the Kennel Club International and finishing second in the inaugural KC Nations (Midi) Cup representing England, their team beating England A!

Keith has another Akita now, from Italy and is training a Border Collie for next season (2007). He has just taken on a Kromfohrlander puppy from Holland to be his next Medium dog for the 2007-2008 season.

Keith is now looking forward to training his two newest dogs, the first he has bought specifically for agility, He plans to reduce his weekends away competing, picking those events where he can enjoy his new 'second hand' caravan and anticipating the luxury of accessories that work his previous caravan being 29 years old and showing its age! 

From Mike Afia...
I was interested in the article about vaccinating each year. About four months after my Spaniel got his booster, he collapsed with an auto-immune blood disease. He is still on medication and will be for the rest of his life. His blood is now stabilising, and my collie is regularly done. Needless to say, my spaniel will never see another of these vaccinations. (19/0206)